Forestneeds

March 3, 2006

Cypresses at Mimi

Filed under: Cypresses,Timber Growing,Trees — shem kerr @ 9:33 pm

In 1927 a school horticultural teaching assistant left a lasting legacy at Mimi school in coastal North Taranaki, New Zealand.Ten year old Mimi cypresses; heads For over 60 years school children watched a stand of Monterey cypress grow next to the school yard. When in 1994 the School board had the trees felled to cash in the value of the logs, Jim Phillips collected seed from what he considered to be the best tree in the stand. He sowed the seed and planted the seedlings on a roadside slip on his farm. Ten years after planting the trees are up to 20m high
and 33cm dbh.Ten year old Mimi cypress trunk 33cm dbh

In 2002 when these trees were 7 years old, Jim had some cuttings propagated. he planted5m tall Mimi clone 38 months from cutting, 26 after planting these out in 2003. In November 2005, 38 months after striking the cuttings, and 26 months after planting, these were 5m tall; branches were less than 1m long and less than 15mm in diametre

Jim would’ve liked to’ve planted more the next year, but the best he could get were seedlings of Cupressus macrocarpa Rangitoto#3 and Faulkner strain.2.5m Twentyfive months after germination , 15 months after outplanting into existing pines, the cypresses were 2.5m to 3m tall. There are some gaps where the grass and weeds have prevented successful establishment of the cypresses
Some of New Zealand’s best growers achieve, height growth of 1.25m mean annual increment and diametre growth rates of around 2.5cm mai in the first 10 years. Crop harvest dates are seen to be around age 40 years or later. What Jim has shown is that fast early height growth leads to an earlier harvest date. Jim is considering a possible harvest at around 30 years. At the growth rate Jim is getting the butt logs in these trees will be more than 1m small end diametre.

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